Posts Tagged ‘ubuntucloud’

Ubuntu, the only web server OS showing growth?

// October 10th, 2011 // Comments Off // Uncategorized

According to W3Techs, Ubuntu is the only web server OS showing a continuous growth rate for (at least) the last year. After passing Suse and Fedora last year, we passed in front of RHEL usage in July.  CentOS and Debian are still ahead though.

Usage of Linux for web sites, W3Techs

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Updated EBS boot AMIs for Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy on Amazon EC2 (2011-10-06)

// October 8th, 2011 // 1 Comment » // Uncategorized

Canonical has released updated instance-store AMIs for Ubuntu 8.04 LTS Hardy on Amazon EC2. Read Ben Howard’s announcement on the ec2ubuntu Google group.

I have released corresponding EBS boot AMIs for Ubuntu 8.04 LTS Hardy using the exact same image Canonical used to build the instance-store AMIs.

You can find the AMI ids for Canonical’s AMIs and for the AMIs I just built in the table at the top of Alestic.com. Just click on the region you are using to see the ids.

The updated code I used to build the EBS boot AMIs by downloading Canonical’s images is available on github.

If you’re not already using the venerable Ubuntu Hardy, please start with a more modern release, like Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Lucid or Ubuntu 11.04 Natty.

Original article: http://alestic.com/2011/10/ec2-hardy-ebs

New Release of Alestic Git Server

// October 5th, 2011 // Comments Off // Uncategorized

New AMIs have been released for the Alestic Git Server. Major upgrade points include:

  • Base operating system upgraded to Ubuntu 11.04 Natty

  • Git upgraded to version 1.7.4.1

  • gitolite upgraded to version 2.1 (master branch)

You can find the latest Alestic Git Server AMI ids and documentation at:

http://alestic.com/alestic-git/

Questions and comments are welcomed on the Alestic Git group.

Original article: http://alestic.com/2011/10/ec2-git-server-release

Using ServerFault.com for Amazon EC2 Q&A

// September 26th, 2011 // Comments Off // Uncategorized

The Amazon EC2 Forum has been around since the beginning of EC2 and has always been a place where you can get your EC2 questions in front of an audience of experts and Amazon employees.

Though I’m still listed as one of the top posters (scored by questioners marking my answers as helpful) I’ve slowed down my activity on that forum due to the sheer volume of support requests, many of which are commonly asked questions or things that only Amazon can help with.

I’ve started answering Amazon EC2 related questions on Stack Exchange sites like Server Fault, a place where system administrators can get questions answered by experts. Here’s my profile on serverfault which linkes to answers I’ve posted. Click “newest” to see the most recent.

http://serverfault.com/users/30542/eric-hammond

If you use an RSS reader, you can follow a feed for all questions tagged amazon-ec2:

[RSS] http://serverfault.com/feeds/tag/amazon-ec2

You can even follow all new answers posted by an individual like, say, that Eric Hammond fellow:

[RSS] http://serverfault.com/feeds/user/30542

Original article: http://alestic.com/2011/09/ec2-serverfault

Using ServerFault.com for Amazon EC2 Q&A

// September 26th, 2011 // Comments Off // Uncategorized

The Amazon EC2 Forum has been around since the beginning of EC2 and has always been a place where you can get your EC2 questions in front of an audience of experts and Amazon employees.

Though I’m still listed as one of the top posters (scored by questioners marking my answers as helpful) I’ve slowed down my activity on that forum due to the sheer volume of support requests, many of which are

I’ve started answering Amazon EC2 related questions on Stack Exchange sites like Server Fault, a place where system administrators can get questions answered by experts. Here’s my profile on serverfault which linkes to answers I’ve posted. Click “newest” to see the most recent.

http://serverfault.com/users/30542/eric-hammond

If you use an RSS reader, you can follow a feed for all questions tagged amazon-ec2:

[RSS] http://serverfault.com/feeds/tag/amazon-ec2

You can even follow all new answers posted by an individual like, say, that Eric Hammond fellow:

[RSS] http://serverfault.com/feeds/user/30542

Original article: http://alestic.com/2011/09/ec2-serverfault

Rebooting vs. Stop/Start of Amazon EC2 Instance

// September 24th, 2011 // Comments Off // Uncategorized

When you reboot a physical computer at your desk it is very similar to shutting down the system, and booting it back up. With Amazon EC2, rebooting an instance is much the same as with a local physical computer, but a stop/start differs in a few keys ways that may cause some problems and definitely have some benefits.

When you stop an EBS boot instance you are giving up the physical hardware that the server was running on and EC2 is free to start somebody else’s instance there.

Your EBS boot volume (and other attached EBS volumes) are still preserved, though they aren’t really tied to a physical or virtual server. They are just associated with an instance id that isn’t running anywhere.

When you start the instance again, EC2 picks some hardware to run it on, ties in the EBS volume(s) and boots it up again.

Things that change when you stop/start include:

  1. New internal IP address (though could randomly be the same).

  2. New external IP address (though could randomly be the same).

  3. If an Elastic IP address was associated with the instance before it was stopped, then you’ll need to re-associate it after the start. (Behavior may differ with VPC instances.)

  4. Any contents on the instance’s former ephemeral storage were wiped and you are given fresh ephemeral storage (often mounted as /mnt).

  5. You can leave an instance stopped for as long as you like and not get charged for run time (though you do get charged at a much lower rate for the EBS volume storage). See the next point.

  6. A fresh billing hour is started for the instance when you start it again. E.g., if you start a new instance and then stop/start it 3 times within the first 60 minutes, you’ll get charged for 4 hours instead of 1.

  7. There is a small chance that EC2 will not have available slots of the correct instance type to run your instance when you want to start it again. I’ve had this happen and temporarily switched to a different, available instance type to get it running again.

When you reboot, it’s a simple reboot at the OS level and the instance stays running on the same hardware, with the same private and public IP addresses, keeps the same Elastic IP address (if associated), and keeps the same ephemeral storage without getting wiped. No new billing hour is started on a reboot and you do not give up the instance hardware.

While an instance is stopped, you can do some cool things before starting it again. Here’s an article I wrote on changing the instance type of an instance while it’s stopped:

Moving an EC2 Instance to a Larger Size

Here’s an article I wrote on how to change the size of an EBS boot disk of an instance while it’s stopped:

Resizing the Root Disk on a Running EBS Boot EC2 Instance

Here’s an article I wrote on how to examine the root disk of an instance (while it’s stopped) when you can’t connect to it while it’s runnning:

Fixing Files on the Root EBS Volume of an EC2 Instance

Since the stop/start cycle has a good chance of moving your instance to new hardware, it’s an easy way to replace your instance hardware if you suspect that the current platform might be going bad and causing problems. Here’s an article I wrote about that:

A Simpler Way To Replace Instance Hardware on EC2

Warning: “Stopping” an instance is completely different from “terminating” an instance! When you terminate an EC2 instance, by default it deletes the EBS boot volume and other volumes that were created at run time. Make sure you understand the difference before you start doing one or the other.

[I originally posted this article as an answer to a serverfault question, but liked it enough to archive it on this blog.]

Original article: http://alestic.com/2011/09/ec2-reboot-stop-start

Ensemble gets some juju!

// September 14th, 2011 // 26 Comments » // Sticky Posts, Uncategorized

Ensemble gets some juju!

The project with working title Ensemble, will make its first release under the name juju as part of Ubuntu 11.10’s Universe collection of packages. We will have a series of planned 11.10 Stable Release Updates for juju throughout the push to 12.04 LTS, which will mark the first enterprise release of the product.

Juju is the word for “magic” in the same African languages from which the term Ubuntu comes.  Formulas will become charms (such magic is conducted with charms) and Principia will become the Charm Collection.

Why the name change?

While we liked the sophistication and refinement that went along with the name “Ensemble”, we were struggling to find a cohesive link between the tool itself, “formulas” for deployment, and “Principia” (the shared collection of formulas we want to grow a community around).  All three were great names by themselves, but when combined didn’t connect well as a whole.  First we considered going for a more music focused theme, with formulas becoming “collaborations” “chords” or “sheets” for example.  However, given there’s already the Ubuntu Orchestra project, we felt like we might be taking the music theme too far, plus we were already having confusion around the two because of the name similarities.  So we decided to go with something that had a bit of excitement and “punch” to it, that could also represent the same fun we’ve found folks having when using our project.  We figured it should represent the complexities and mystery that often surround those skilled in the DevOps field, and be something that played on the same “u” sound and etymology as Ubuntu.  Thus, “juju” was born!

When will the change happen?

Immediately!  We’ve already created juju.ubuntu.com, with a redirect from ensemble.ubuntu.com in place.  We also have the irc channel #juju reserved on freenode, and will soon rename the mailing list to juju@lists.ubuntu.com. Over the next week, we’ll update documentation, the associated Launchpad projects and teams, the code itself, and update the packages in Oneiric.  Everything will be done and ready for testing in the Ubuntu 11.10 Beta 2 release.  We’ll follow that up with updating the charms and will make new cloud.ubuntu.com related screencasts where feasible.  For the record nothing else is changing, but the naming…the code and formulas will behave the same.

If you run into any problems or having any questions, please send them to me or post to ensemble@lists.ubuntu.com.

Thanks!

Robbie Williamson <robbie@ubuntu.com>
On behalf of the juju development team

Nick Barcet: Tout sur le cloud en Septembre à Paris?

// September 11th, 2011 // Comments Off // Uncategorized

[English version below]

Vous souhaitez tout savoir sur le Cloud? Je participe et co-organize deux évènements sur Paris la troisième semaine de Septembre:

OpenStack in Action, le 21 Septembre, Avec Rackspace (representé par le Project Leader de Nova/OpenStack Compute, Vish Ishaya) , eNovance, UShareSoft, Dell, OW2 et Canonical.

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Tout sur le cloud en Septembre à Paris

// September 11th, 2011 // Comments Off // Uncategorized

[English version below]

Vous souhaitez tout savoir sur le Cloud? Je participe et co-organize deux évènements sur Paris la troisième semaine de Septembre:

OpenStack in Action, le 21 Septembre, Avec Rackspace (representé par le Project Leader de Nova/OpenStack Compute, Vish Ishaya) , eNovance, UShareSoft, Dell, OW2 et Canonical.

read more

DevOps Cafe podcaster, John Willis, talks about Ensemble

// August 22nd, 2011 // Comments Off // Uncategorized

Listen to what John Willis (@botchagalupe), VP of Solutions, DTO Solutions has to say about Ensemble in the latest DevOps Cafe podcast installment.